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>>> making news in america this morning. >> president obama gets ready to make his case for the u.s. role in libya. today's speech to the nation comes as libyan rebels go on the offensive. >>> japan rattled by another earthquake as the credibility gap widens in confusing statements about that criminalled nuclear plant. >>> and back here at h final four final four bound. virginia commonwealth gets ready for another wild week after another march madness stunner. >>> good morning. we begin with libya where rebel forces are advancing on the capital tripoli this morning. >> and there's an unconfirmed report they've already taken moammar gadhafi's hometown which is a government stronghold, the rebels are benefitting from they air strikes by the international coalition. >> and tonight, president obama tells the american people why the u.s. thread effort. abc's emily schmidt joins us with more. good morning. >> reporter: peggy and rob good morning to you. this is now day ten of the no-fly zone over libya. president obama plans to address the nation tonight about libya. he's expected to say
. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
that was run by the u.s. will be commanded by nato, an obama diplomatic win. but many in congress warn president obama not to send u.s. ground troops to depose gadhafi, who is said to be in this car today. >> yes, we want him out. no, we don't want to do it at the enormous cost of military invasion. >> reporter: the president has to justify taking sides in what some see as a civil war. >> will america's commitment & end in days, not weeks, as the president promised? >> reporter: defense secretary gates admitted on "meet the press," libya is not vital. >> no, i don't think it's vital interests for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the recently, which is a vital interest for the united states. >> reporter: a region in chaos, uprisings in egypt, syria, bahrain, jordan, might the president commit the u.s. military elsewhere. libya's already cost about $1 billion. with no clear end in sight. >>> tonight, some u.s. naviville vessels are reported to be pulling out of the mediterranean. tomorrow, u.s. allies meet about libya. the plan is to put pressure
center to address e glacier melt in the andes. in addition, a new u.s.-chile business council will encourage coaboration between our countries and areas like energy efficiency and renewable technologies. our governments have agreed to share our experience in dealing with natural disasters, area where chile has enormous expertise which is critical to recovery and economic reconstruction. we discussed our shared commitment to expanding education exchanges among our students. we can learn from each other and bring our country even closer together. in my speech i will announce an ambitious new initiative to increase student exchanges between the u.s. and latin america, including chile. even as we deepen cooperation between our two countries, i want to take this opportunity to commend chile for the leadership role is increasingly playing across the americas. chile is a vital contributor to the un mission in haiti, where we agreed that yesterday's election is an opportunity to enhance recovery efforts. strong legislation will fight the scourge of human trafficking. mr. president, i
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
, whether the u.s. should help the rebels by providing them with weapons. emily schmidt has the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. president obama says he is looking at all options to support the rebels. but when members of the international diplomatic community met in london and had a chance to talk about it, one member said the talk of arming rebels didn't come up. with nato set to take command of military operation, president obama says moammar gadhafi is feeling the pressure. >> the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. their days are probably numbered. >> reporter: diplomats from more than three dozen countries met in london yesterday, to discuss libya in a potential post-gadhafi era. >> we must help people plan for their future after the conflict is over. >> reporter: but forces loyal to gadhafi are pushing back rebels from ground they just gained. diplomats say they did not discuss arming the rebels. though, the idea is up for debate. >> there could be a legitimate transfer of arms if i country would choose to do that. >> we are th
the u.s. action in libya. >>> good afternoon, i'm pat lawson muse. >> and i'm wendy rieger sitting in for jim handly. president obama addresses the nation tonight on the latest in libya, and his main message will be reassurance that the u.s. role will be limited. but the president is under pressure to justify his intervention there, and to spell out just how soon u.s. forces can disengage. steve handelsman has the latest on the speech and the war from the white house. >> reporter: president obama today on univision, spanish language tv, previewed what he'll promise the nation about libya. >> our involvement there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: that looks more likely today. [ gunfire ] >> reporter: libyan rebels are advancing, libyan civilians are safer. it's a dramatic turn-around because of the u.s. and our allies. moammar gadhafi's heavy weapons are being destroyed by coalition pilots. and the air attack that was run by the u.s. will be commanded by nato, an obama diplomatic win. but many in congress warn president obama not to send u.s. ground tr
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
, husband number six, u.s. senator, john warner. >> heart and soul were just as beautiful as her classic face and majestic eyes. >> reporter: but it was her romance to richard burton whom she first married in 1974 and then again in 1985, that created a media frenzy. >> they were trail blazers for the paparazzi. there had never been anything like. that never stars that big. never a romance that famous and public and scandalous. >> reporter: in 2009, she privately mourned the passing of one of her best friends, michael jackson. in her later years, it was her charity work for aids research that she says kept her going. just days after celebrating her 79th birthday in february, taylor was hospitalized with congestive heart failure. she will be remembered for her beauty, generosity and grace. a private family funeral will be held later this week. the family asked that in lew of flowers, donations be made to the elizabeth taylor aids foundation. in los angeles, news4. >> elizabeth taylor had a major connection to the washington area. she married former virginia senator john warner back in 1976
eventually come in the form of weapons, shipments from the u.s. speaking to brian williams, president obama said arming the rebels is a possibility. >> i am not ruling it out but i'm also not ruling it in. we are still making an assessment partly about what gadhafi's forces are going to be doing. we are not taking anything off the table at this point. >> the president said that no matter what options the u.s. pursues, it should not be seen as a president for action in countries like yemen or sear qua. >> i think it is important not to take this particular situation and then try to project some sort of obama doctrine ta doctrine that we are going to apply in a cookie-cutter fashion across the board. each country in this region is different. our principles remain the same. >> new polls show u.s. action in libya is not going over with the american public. quinnipiac found that 47% oppose america's involvement there and 41% support it. nearly three quarters of americans fear the u.s. will get drawn into a long-term conflict. msnbc's jim maceda is live for us on the phone from tripoli. jim, it s
international trade, but now some pirates put in their place by u.s. commandos. >>> plus, this guy took less than a minute to steal the loot. >> that's not very smart, but it's original. haven't seen that one yet. >> maybe we've seen too much. now the hunt for the droopy drawers bandit. >>> intense fight noting in lib. heavy gun fire, a common sound there. the uprising becoming the bloodiest in the way of unrest. front line of the fighting, smoke rising there, a possible signal of a new phase in the battle as forces loyal to libyan leader moammar gadhafi use air power to bomb rebel fighters. fierce ground battles still raging between the two, the rebels working to cut a path toward the capital city of tripoli. and this is what they're facing when they get there. those are pro-gadhafi crowds. gather not guilty tripoli's square earlier, loyalists ready to defend their leader, they say, no matter what the cost. here is one of them. >> there is nobody in this state or in this city against gadhafi. >> steve harrigan is streaming live in tripoli. steve, our question, is leader gadhafi still contro
nuclear plant and its implications for nuclear safety in the u.s. >>> and in japan, the officials there wall the situation very grave after confirming that highly toxic plutonium is seeking from the plant. plant operators say the amount of the pleau toneium is not a -- plutonium is not a risk to humans. but it's evidence that there is a leakage from the facility. >>> hitting a wall, what libyan rebels have been stopped. >>> a muslim civil rights hear something going on right now in washington, d.c. we'll find out about the testimony by a member of the san francisco-based group. >>> good morning. we'll have lows in the 40s and then more clouds in the morning and then fewer in the afternoon. tomorrow mid- to upper 70s are possible. >>> in libya today, government troops drove back an assault of rebel sources on moammar gadhafi's town. this comes after several easy days of opposition. they were outgunned by government troops at the entrance to search moammar gadhafi's home town. >>> moments ago, secretary of state, hillary clinton, speaking in london said military action in libya will
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
video. u.s. forces, japan, and great britain, are leading the forces. a top african official is calling for a transition in libya that would remove gadhafi from power and allow democratic elections there. mary? >> denise, thank you. president obama has yet to address the mission. publicly. he is expected to do so. >>> looks like march could be going out like a lion. it's chilly outside. meteorologist tim williams is there. and he has the "s" word in his forecast. >> well, hello, kai. good afternoon, everyone. we're looking at just the "s" word in our forecast. let's look at live doppler radar. we are definitely cooler right now than we typically are for this time of year. about 10 degrees or so cooler. we're at 45 now. and we're really at the warmest we're going to be for the day. give or take maybe a degree or so. what you're seeing on the screen right now is not really our main concern. that's really an upper level disturbance. it's going to move across the south portion of our region, maybe bringing in a light shower or two. down toward the d.c. and metro area. the bullk is still --
. the u.s. tells americans to evacuate the danger zone and sends in planes to get them out of japan. >>> and two exclusive interviews. tiger and trump. we go airborne with donald trump, who is sounding more like a candidate for president. >> part of the beauty of me is that i'm very rich. if i need $600 million, i can put up $600 million myself. >> and tiger tees off about his frustrations on the golf course. and the challenge of living life as a single dad. >>> and good morning, america, e on this st. patrick's day. the latest developments this morning. steam still rising from three of those nuclear reactors. one of those, worse, in fact. it shows the plant at a very critical point. and japanese officials saying, a slight radiation increase is too small to harm the people around tokyo. >> here's what happened when you were asleep. you saw the military helicopters. they tried to dump 30 tons of sea water on the reactors. they go over it. and a lot of the water dissipates before it hits them. even if all of it went in, all 30 tons, that would be a drop in the bucket. just to give you
now entered it's second week. why the u.s. is now trying to take a back seat in the operation. >>> one maryland county is trying to put more room between protesters and funerals, how they plan to do it. >>> the fbi says she stuffed nearly $80,000 in cash into her underwear, i'm kelly mcpherson, coming up on eyewitness news, we'll detail additional charges for ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> welcome back to eyewitness news saturday morning. i'm gigi barnett. >>> i'm tim williams. it is around 30 degrees at bwi, marshal in baltimore a degree or so warmer. it will not be a very warm day overall. the sky is brightening. we have clouds but the sun is peaking through the horizon. we have a good bit of cloud cover right now. that is ahead of a storm system that is moving in. it will be passing on our south side over the next 12 hours or so. we will start to see the potential for snow showers that we'll talk about in a moment. for today 46 degrees, chilly with times of clouds and sun. 30 degrees, mostly cloudy with a little snow late. we're talking after midnight. your day's events today we'll be oka
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
, is it possible for the u.s. to become a country of secular atheists that is also ruled by radical islamists? newt gingrich seems to think so. that's in "the sideshow." >>> we're going to start with president obama's speech on libya. howard fineman is the senior political editor for "the huffington post," and susan page. the washington bureau chief for "usa today" and i have to call her madam president of the gridiron. and she's on there today. howard and susan, at first we outlined four questions for president obama to answer in his speech and today we'll see how he did. first, take a look at some of the republican responses to the speech since he gave it. >> he made a very puzzling comment, and that was regime change by force would be a mistake. gadhafi must have been somewhat comforted by that. >> now we're in this position of having a president of the united states saying gadhafi must go but we're not going to necessarily make him go. >> how our commander in chief chose to handle this new dilemma raises serious questions about his understanding of constitutional checks and balances. while the
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
as the president debated whether or not the u.s. could start arming rebel groups. >>> it was 30 years ago today that a gunman fired shots at president ronald reagan. a look back at that day and the only local tv interview with jim brady, the press secretary who suffered life-altering wounds in the assassination attempt. fox 5 morning news starts right now. >>> let's take a look outside as we look at traffic on the wilson bridge, early on this wednesday morning. it's march 30th, getting close to the end of the month. one more day left in this third month of the year. good morning, i'm steve chenevey. >> and i'm allison seymour. glad that you are with us today. and i seem to recall this is going to be the nicest day of the week. did i miss that. >> i think yesterday might have been. i think you might have missed it. >> i missed it. i was hoping for this day. >> but this might be the nicest moment of this particular day. >> there you go, live for the moment. enjoy the next few minutes, it's going to be nice. and then we have the changes. >> and it's done. >> and it's over. yesterda
for -- working for the u.s. government essentially, then the private side, those workers, it was incumbent upon them, what they asked for, they didn't want to ask for so much they were going to break the company they worked for because they'd be out of luck and out of a job, but the public side doesn't have that same kind of relationship. >> no. the relationship between the public sector worker union is with a politician on the other side of the negotiating fence. in the private sector, it's a private sector union person negotiating with a corporate boss for wages and benefits and pensions, and the two are very different. the corporation must rely on profits, the politician relies on the taxpayer and tax revenue. a very different kettle of fish, with very different outcomes as we can see today. martha: that's a tricky marriage, so to speak, as we watch this all unfold. stuart varney from the fox business network and varney & co. bill: back to this weather, flooding and tornadoes leaving a path of destruction in the midwest, we watched this live during our program yesterday. this is flooding in
" proof of life. >> what the u.s. government is stage also the reaction from the overjoyed family. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> i'm mike marusarz sitting in for rob nelson. that agent was working in iran when he disappeared and now u.s. officials say though don't know why they're finally getting this evidence that he's still alive. >> and also ahead, more navy officers get called on the carpet and punished. that's after a navy commander filmed anti-gay videos on the ship. the angry words from the top brass. >>> coming up later, the uproar at northwestern university, it's outside chicago. the story involves a sex toy demonstration done in the classroom. >> yeah, wait until you hear about this. pretty -- pretty saucy stuff. i don't know how to describe it. >> you could go a lot of different ways there. we'll leave it there. >> very well. >>> first, nearly four years after vanishing in iran, there is proof of life. the u.s. government says this morning a missing retired fbi agent is alive. >> that's right. as
to stabilize the crippled reactors at the plant. but explosions, fire and smoke are slowing progress. the u.s. is now sending two barges, filled with fresh water to help cool the reactors. in tokyo, the concern about radiation is growing. residents are waiting in long lines to get bottled water, despite assurances from city officials that the tap water is safe. radiation has seeped into produce grown near the plant. and now, radioactive sedium is turning up in greens grown more than 100 miles away in tokyo. as japan struggles to leave tens 10s -- help 10s ever thousands left homeless, contaminated food now threatens to make the crisis even worse. >> the death toll is now more than 10,000 in japan. and more than 17,000 people are still missing tonight. as part of wjz's continuing community commitment, you can support disaster relief efforts to help the people affected there. text "red cross" to 90999 to make a $10 donation. or visit red redcross.org. and you can also call 1-800-red cross. >>> thousands of people are working to get working in maryland. 8100 jobs were created in maryland last mo
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
carrying out any sort of no-fly zone resolution like the one that was passed yesterday. in terms of u.s. involvement, when you think of a no-fly zone, the first thing that comes to mind is american fighter pilots flying over foreign country. but the u.s. has many more ways that it could contribute to this effort. from folks i've been speaking to here in the building, there's also could be the possibility of unmanned drones being used in the area. the u.s. has signal jamming aircraft that could disrupt the communication between colonel gadhafi and some of his forces. they also have radar aircraft that could help coordinate some of the air traffic control if you had planes going out on no fly missions. even planes from other countries. right now, the u.s. has about five warships in that area, although the aircraft carrier, the "uss enterprise" that was in the mediterranean sea has now left. left earlier this week and now out in the arabian sea. there has been, within the u.s., a real debate about this no-fly zone primarily on two fronts. one says the u.s. waited much too long. in fact, th
ground attacks. president obama will speak to the nation tonight to explain what role the u.s. will play in the mission in libya now that nato stepped in. the president is also expected to address concerns by both parties who say he should have consulted with congress before a military intervention. nbc's tracie potts joins us now from washington with details. good morning to you. >> reporter: veronica, good morning. good morning, everyone. the president's got a lot of questions to answer when he addresses the nation tonight. lawmakers here want to know should we even be involved in libya or should we be doing more to take down libya's leader? >> the president's going to address the nation monday night. a lot of these questions will be answered. >> reporter: questions like whether we'll handguns to rebels. >> no decision has been made about that. >> reporter: and how much the u.s. will be involved after nato takes over. >> within the next week or so, we will begin to diminish the commitment of resources. >> reporter: tonight, president obama's supposed to lay out the plan. he said gadhaf
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
the tip, u.s. marshals tracked down thomas. and when he tossed a cigarette into the street last week, they had their sample. when the dna matched, they had their suspect. >> dna was collected in and subsequently matched by the state forensic sciences lab, confirming that thomas was the east coast rapist. >> reporter: just hours after his arrest, thomas reportedly tried to hang himself in his connecticut jail cell. during his first hearing this morning, neither he nor his court-appointed attorney entered plea in the case. jay gray, nbc news >>> aaron thomas is being held on 1.5 dollars bond >>> there would be a new glimmer of hope for prisoners who maintain their innocence in person is crimes. inmates can file civil rights lawsuits if they're denied access to dna evidence in their case. this decision stems from a death row inmate from texas who says he has not been allowed to test evidence that could potentially overturn his conviction. his execution will be held off until that case is decided. >>> we have breaking news this afternoon from prince jorjs county. police are investigatin
>>> good morning. making the case. president obama gets set to address the nation tonight, on the u.s. mission in libya, from short-term goals to a possible exit strategy. this as rebel forces gain ground, and allied air strikes continue to pound targets inside libya, including moammar gadhafi's hometown. >>> radiation scare. after a partial meltdown at japan's crippled nuclear plant, radiation levels are 100,000 times higher than normal. as the government warns that the contamination is creeping into sea water and the ground, now traces of radiation are being detected as far away as massachusetts. >>> and wedding worries. with just over one month to go until the royal wedding, a huge anti-government protest in london turned violent, putting a renewed spotlight on security for the big day. this as new details emerge on everything from the cake to the bachelor party "early" this monday morning, march 28th, bachelor party "early" this monday morning, march 28th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning from london. you are looking at a beautiful day here. we are live at buckingha
advocacy group will take to the streets of the u.s. capitol dark the council on american islamic phrelgss, you probably know them as care, long with dozens of other civil rights groups are challenging the muslim radicalization hearings that are going to get underway in the capitol tomorrow yesterday during our show care's spokesperson blasted the organizer of these hearings, house homeland security committee chairman peter king listen to what he said: >> congressman king has a history of making antimuslim remarks such as there are too many mosques in america, he's also in early january replied that muslims are not american when it comes to pushing back against violent extremism, then he goes on in what he does and puts out a bunch of false allegations he says # on, 85 percent of muslim american leadtium -- leadership are extremists and not cooperating with law enforcement martha: peter king, getting ready for the hearings tomorrow, joins me to respond good morning congressman >> good morning, how are you? >> martha: doing fine, thank you what about those comments? did you say that 85 perc
remain, can the u.s. realistically try terror suspects and close down the prison at the same time. richard wolffe is at the white house with the latest on this. let's start with why the reversal on the president's position here. >> reporter: well, this reversal has been in the work x for a couple of years now and it starts up with the politics of it. they turned against this president early in his term when democrats joined with republicans to cut off funding to transfer prisoners to a high security prison likely to be illinois, but once the politics changed and we saw it with the recent defense spending bill there was no physical way or a practical way they could really close down guantanamo bay because, remember, the other disappointment for them other countries around the world have not taken as many detainees as the incoming president thought he would be able to convince them to take. and lastly, the president's fundamental judgment has changed. his commitment to civil liberties has come up in a clash with his commitment to national security and national security has won out.
. the u.s. counts on him to keep pressure on al qaeda in yemen and is reportedly trying to broker a deal. by phone, a newspaper editor said the president and the nation are running out of time. >> i don't think it will take more than a week. i believe he'll step down less than a week if he is asked or we could see a civil war after it the week. >> reporter: and now supporters and -- nentss opponents. the violence happening as secretary gates was here. reforms clearly not happening fast enough for the thousands in the streets across the region. we expect to see more protests here in jordan and in syria after funerals to bury the dead. and in yemen, those talks continue, but at this point, everything seems to be at a very intense stalemate. >> ron allen, thanks. and for more we're joined by mark halperin. good morning. civilians are being targeted in many places. yet it's only libya where the world seems to be reapgting with the no-fly zone and no drive zone. let me start off by playing what president obama said on that very question this morning in his weekly radio address. >> the united
monday night to explain the u.s. role in libya. and this morning in his weekly radio address, he defended sending forces there, and said the mission has been a success. david kerley is at the white house. david, the president appears to have gone on the offense, taking a lot of heat from both sides. >> reporter: he has taken a lot of criticism. you're starting to see the rollout this morning of the message from this white house that this is going well. and trying to explain to the american people what the president hopes to accomplish in libya. the weekly address today. tomorrow, you'll see the secretary of state and the defense secretary, on the sunday shows. and the speech by the president on monday night. the president spoke to 21 members of congress on a conference call, trying to nullify their concerns last night. >> and nato is supposed to take over libya tomorrow. how involved will the u.s. be in day-to-day operations there? >> reporter: that's a message that has not been very clear. the president says the u.s. is moving back from the leadership role as nato takes over. but the u.s
of this catastrophe is still too big to gauge. >>> u.s. geological survey researchers say a new study confirms that large quakes, like the one in japan, do not trigger major quakes far away. seismologists closely watched the day after the magnitude 9 quake in japan and compared that with quakes spend ising a period of 30 years name found that big quakes can trigger smaller quakes within a 600 mile radius, but not thousands of miles away. >>> san francisco will giant the nation in standing up for japan. vigils are set for many cities tomorrow night. the candlelight vigil will be across from san francisco's city hall, and include speech ands from various community leaders. >>> coming up, nato takes over in libya. what that means for the pus. and we'll have the latest on the ground war there next. >>> the largest sex discrimination lawsuit ever is about to reach the nation's highest cart. what it means for wal-mart and other companies. >>> just days after the u.s. spearheaded air strike against libya, nato has said it will assume control of all air operations. today the secretary of defense and s
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more than 200 people including 189 americans died in the lockerbie bombing reports that moammar gadhafi may have ordered the attack, sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. receive any bernstein's husband was on the flight. >> we have chosen to look the other way because of business interests, because for some reason we thought we could bring gadhafi into the family of civilized nations. we now know how wrong
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